All BGRI Abstracts

Displaying 51 - 60 of 415 records | 6 of 42 pages

Mapping of all-stage leaf rust resistance genes in Triticum dicoccoides derived recombinant inbred line (RIL)

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Ahmed Elkot School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141004 India
Rohtas,Singh, Satinder, Kaur, Parveen, Chhuneja, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leaf rust caused by Puccinia triticina is one of the most historical and economically important wheat diseases. Breeding for new cultivars with effective gene combinations is the most promising approach for reducing losses due to leaf rust. Wild emmer wheat, Triticum dicoccoides, the progenitor of modern tetraploid and hexaploid wheats, is an important resource for new variability for disease resistance genes. An accession of T. dicoccoides acc. pau4656 showed resistance against prevailing leaf rust races in India, when tested at the seedling and adult plant stage. The introgression line, developed from the cross of the leaf rust resistant T. dicoccoides acc. pau4656 and the susceptible T. durum cultivar Bijaga yellow, was crossed with T. durum cultivar PBW114 to generate recombinant inbred lines (RIL) for mapping leaf rust resistance gene(s). RIL population was screened against highly virulent leaf rust race 77-5 at seedling stage and inheritance analyses revealed the segregation of two leaf rust resistance genes. The genes have been temporarily designated as LrD1 and LrD2. A set of 387 SSR marker was used for bulked segregant analysis (BSA). The markers showing diagnostic polymorphism in the resistant and susceptible bulks were amplified on whole of the population. Single marker analysis using MapDisto software placed LrD1 on the long arm of chromosome 6A linked to the SSR marker Xwmc256 and LrD2 on long arm of chromosome 2A close to the SSR marker Xwmc632. T. durum cv. PBW114 used in the present study was also resistant to leaf rust at the seedling stage. So one of these leaf rust resistance genes might have been contributed by the PBW114 and other by T. dicoccoides. The current study identified valuable leaf rust resistance genes for deployment in wheat breeding programme.

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Monitoring wheat diseases in Nepal 2014-2016

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Suraj Baidya Plant Pathology Division, Nepal Agricultural Research Council
Baidya Nath Mahto, Durba Bahadur, Thapa Roshan, Basnet Nautan Raj, Gautam Sesh, Raman Upadhyaya

Disease surveillance is very important in establishing the status of disease response in crops. During the 2014 to 2016 wheat seasons, foliar blight (spot blotch caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana and tan spot caused by Pyrenophora tritici-repentis) was recorded as severe across the entire whole plains region. Foliar blight was moderate in the mid hills, especially the Kathmandu valley. Leaf rust was severe (10MS - 100S) at several places in the mid hills. This could be due either to climatic conditions or varieties susceptible to the prevailing pathotypes. Yellow rust was also recorded up to 100S in the Kathmandu valley. Newly released varieties Gaura and Dhaulagiri showed yellow rust incidence of 20MS to 40S. Stem rust was sporadic and light and was observed very late in the season (tR - 10MR) in far western districts and the Kathmandu valley. Powdery mildew was moderate and localized. Loose smut was found at low levels throughout the mid hills. In 2014, Karnal bunt (caused by Tilletia indica) was also recorded in far western regions. Five different pathotypes of P. triticina (121R63-1, 21R55, 21R63 and 0R9) and one Pst pathotype (110S119) have prevailed during the last few years. Wheat genotypes were evaluated at Khumaltar and those reputed to have Yr27, Yr27+, Yr27+Yr18, Yr31+APR, Yr9, Yr10 and Yr15 were resistant. Similarly, genotypes containing Lr34+ had lower leaf rust severities than others.

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Epidemics of stripe (yellow) rust on wheat and triticale fields of Algeria in 2016.

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Nora DERBAL Laboratoire de Biologie, Eau et Environnement, département d'écologie,university of 8 mai1945 Guelma, Algeria
Abdelkader Benbelkacem

Epidemics of stripe (yellow) rust on wheat and triticale fields of Algeria in 2016. Wheat and triticale fields in 69 localities from the eastern regions of Algeria were assessed for epidemics, which started in early march to late may corresponding to booting stage up to early dough stage of the alternative type crop. The infection had incidences ranging from 30 to 100% and severities of 30 to 70%. The newly released cultivar Ksar sbahi was infected up to 10%. The old improved durum cultivars HAR3116 (SHA7/KAUZ) and HAR1407 (COOK/VEES//DOVES) were rust-free at a number of locations. In the Amhara region, the wheat cultivars were at stem elongation to flowering with disease incidences of 50-100% and severities of 30-90%. The oldest cultivar ET 13 A2 was severely infected in the north Shewa zone of Amhara region. Triticale cultivar Logaw Shibo was susceptible at elevations above 2700 m and showed trace reactions at elevations below 2500 m. The local bread wheat cultivar grown in all wheat growing areas was only slightly affected by the disease. Yellow rust was rarely recorded in the Tigray region. Severe epidemics were recorded in the highlands and even at lower elevations where it is not commonly found on wheat.

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Mapping resistance in wheat landraces to the Ug99 race group of the stem rust pathogen

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Kerri Neugebauer USDA-ARS
Ebrahiem Babiker, Tyler Gordon, Sam Stoxen, Matthew Rouse, Yue Jin, Shiaoman Chao, John Bonman

Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), is a threat to wheat production worldwide. To manage this important disease, new sources of genetic resistance are needed and common wheat landraces are a potential source of such resistance. Landrace accessions from the USDA-ARS National Small Grains Collection were evaluated for seedling resistance to the Ug99 race group. To identify accessions most likely to carry novel resistance genes, a bulked segregant analysis (BSA) approach was used. Seven resistant accessions were crossed to a susceptible parent line and F3 families were tested against Pgt race TTKSK. The resistant plants were identified and grouped into two bulks per population. The bulks, along with the parents and F1 progeny, were genotyped with the 90K wheat iSelect SNP genotyping platform. Four of the populations appeared to segregate in a 1:1 phenotypic resistant/susceptible ratio, one in a 1:2 ratio, and two in 1:3 ratios. However, chi squared tests indicated the ratios were statistically the best fit for only two of the 1:1 segregating populations and one of the 1:3 segregating populations. Initial BSA results indicate the markers associated with reduced stem rust infection are located on wheat chromosomes 1DL and 2B. These mapping populations are being advanced for further evaluation to ascertain if novel resistance to the Ug99 stem rust race group is present.

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Changes of some physiological parameters of different wheat genotypes in ontogenesis depending on infection of leave level

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Javanshir Talai Research Institute of Crop Husbandry, Azerbaijan
ATIF,ZAMANOV, Konul, Aslanova, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Rust diseases are considered the main stress factors that limit wheat productivity in the Azerbaijan. The studies on the impact of rust diseases on physiological processes at reproductive vegetation period is of very importance with view of evaluating size of yield and quality of the studied genotypes. For this purpose the studies focused on bread wheat genotypes (Triticum aestivum L.), which differ sharply by architectonics, biological peculiarities and resistance to rust diseases. Comparative evaluation of the studied genotypes by physiological and quality parameters has been undertaken in two options: over plants infected with diseases in natural background, and over healthy plants (fungicide sprayed plants). Area of photosynthesis apparatus of leaf story (18,3-50,2 sm2) of the studied wheat genotypes changes in wide interval. Infestation level of leaves with yellow rust (Puccinia striiformis West.) in wheat genotypes grown in natural infection background fluctuates between 5MS-40S in ontogenesis, but between 10MS-90S with brown rust (Puccinia recondita Desm.).
High level of infection with rust diseases leads to reduced size of leaf assimilation area and defoliation. Reduction of these dimensions makes up 10-90% in lower story leaves of genotypes infected with rust diseases, but 20-30% in upper story leaves. Genotypes with large and bending leaves subject to this disease more frequently. Value of photosynthesis intensity in ontogenesis at upper story leaves of the genotypes infected with rust diseases at natural background fluctuates between 6-18 ?mol CO2 .m-2.s-1 depending on level of infection, but in healthy plants between 16-29 ?molCO2 .m-2.s-1. Negative impact of these diseases on normal course of plant physiological process ultimately causes is reflected in yield and quality parameters.

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Breeding for stripe rust resistance in spring wheat germplasm adapted to Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Fahim Ullah Khan Barani Agricultural Research Station, Kohat
Fida Mohammad, Muhammad Imtiaz

Stripe rust is one of the major limiting factors in wheat production. An objective-based breeding program was initiated at Barani Agricultural Research Station (BARS), Kohat in 2013/14 to transfer APR genes from CIMMYT and ICARDA spring wheat lines into wheat germplasm well adapted in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK). Nine high yielding but stripe rust susceptible KPK wheat varieties were crossed in various combination with 17 CIMMYT and ICARDA wheat lines carrying resistance genes. The resultant 79 F1s were backcrossed with respective susceptible parents followed by single plant selection in F2 generation. During 2015/16, 367 segregating populations/lines were screened in multi-environment stripe rust tests within Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Sixty-nine out of 367 lines showing adequate resistance were again screened for strip rust resistance at hot spot and in yield trial at BARS, Kohat during 2016/17. Seventeen lines showed considerable resistance and were higher yielding than check cultivars. Lines exhibiting adequate resistance will be further tested in advanced yield trial at provincial and national level for possible release of new varieties in wheat.

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Sources of Resistance to Septoria Tritici Blotch Identified in Ethiopian Durum Wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Carlo Fadda Bioversity International
Bogale Nigir, Cherinet Alem, Yosef G. Kidane, Mario Enrico Pè, Matteo Dell'Acqua

Septoria tritici blotch (STB) is a devastating fungal disease affecting durum and bread wheat cultivation worldwide. The search for resistance sources in untapped genetic resources may speed up breeding for STB resistance. Ethiopian durum wheat landraces represent a valuable source of allelic diversity for several traits, including disease resistance. In this study, we measure STB phenotypes under natural infection on two interconnected populations: i) a diversity panel comprising 318 Ethiopian durum wheat lines, mostly farmer varieties, and ii) a nested association mapping (NAM) population developed from a subset of the diversity panel. Phenology, yield and yield component traits were concurrently measured in the populations. We evaluated the distribution of STB resistance in Ethiopian genetic materials and the relationship existing between STB resistance and agronomic traits. STB resistance sources were found in landraces as well as in NAM lines. The genetic material was genotyped with more than 13 thousand genome-wide SNP markers to describe the linkage disequilibrium and genetic structure existing within the panels. The genotyping information was combined with phenotypes to identify marker-trait associations and loci involved in STB resistance. We identified several loci, each explaining up to 10% of the phenotypic variance for disease resistance. We developed KASP markers tagging the most interesting loci to allow the uptake of our results in a breeding perspective. Our results showed that the Ethiopian untapped allelic diversity bears a great value for studying the molecular basis of STB resistance and for breeding for resistance in local and international material.

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Achieving triple rust resistance in wheat through combination of phenomic and genomic tools

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Urmil Bansal University of Sydney Plant Breeding Institute
Naeela Qureshi, Vallence Nsaiyera, Pakeer Kandiah, Mesfin Gesesse, Mandeep Randhawa, Mumta Chhetri, Bosco Chenayek, James Kolmer, Miroslav Valarik, Zaroslav Dolezel, Beat Keller, Matthew Hayden, Justin Faris, Harbans Bariana, Vanessa Wells

Dr. Norman Borlaug stated that rust never sleeps and this enables rust pathogens to produce new strains capable of putting rust resistance genes to rest. These pathogens continue to pose threats to global wheat production. Wheat breeders have made significant progress to control rust outbreaks using conventional selection technologies; however, some critical shifts in pathogen populations have let them down. Rapid evolution in molecular marker technologies in the last 15 years and refinement of phenomic facilities have expedited the process of discovery and characterisation of rust resistance genes to underpin the development and validation of markers closely linked with genetically diverse sources of resistance. A high proportion of the formally named rust resistance genes were characterized in the 21st century and markers closely linked with these genes have been developed and validated. The marker tagged sources of resistance to three rust diseases have equipped the wheat breeding community with tools to deploy combinations of all stage and adult plant resistance genes in future wheat cultivars. The question that whether we have enough resistance genes discovered to compete against the ever-awake rust pathogens. In our opinion, we cannot be complacent and discovery needs to continue to ensure food security. This presentation will discuss the role of advances in phenomic and genomic technologies to achieve durable rust control in wheat.

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Wheat Improvement Program combat in context with global cimate change

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Makhdoom Hussain Wheat Research Institute, Faisalabad, Pakistan
Ghulam Mahboob Subhani, Javed Ahmad, Abid Mahmood

Global warming affects the environmental parameters of agro-based countries like temperature increase, melting of glaciers, floods, erratic rains, low temperature, frost and high temperature. As a result agriculture is becoming more vulnerable to global environmental shifts. In case of wheat, erratic or low rains badly affect the wheat crop of rainfed areas of the country along with high temperature at seedling or juvenile stage. Similarly, frost affects the early sown wheat crop in irrigated areas of Punjab. Lesser availability of irrigation water from water reservoirs also reduces the wheat crop productivity. Sudden increase in temperature (>30?C) during the month of March adversely affect the grain filling. High temperature during grain filling stage interferes with the photosynthetic activities of the plant due to enhanced maturity, grain become shriveled and results in low grain yield. The threat of these environmental changes can only be overcome through breeding with specific objectives which is cost effective once obtained.
Hence development of wheat varieties for frost, drought and heat tolerance is the only feasible solution to combat these stresses which is being used at Wheat Program of Ayub Agricultural Research Institute, Faisalabad, Pakistan. New emphasis is also being given to develop frost resistant wheat varieties due to changing scenario of last few years. The institute is actively involved for the development of heat, drought and frost tolerant wheat varieties. During working for tolerance against any of these stresses plant types to be breed are physiologically and morphologically modeled in such a way that they should be capable of tolerating respective stress. In addition to breeding work an extensive research is also being done at Wheat Research Institute, AARI., Faisalabad to investigate best agronomic strategies to make wheat crop best adapted to environmental stress conditions.

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SSR analysis of 2015 Puccinia graminis f. sp tritici population in Kenya

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Edgar Okello University of Eldoret
Julius Ochuodho, Ruth Wanyera, Sridhar Bhavani, Les Szabo

Stem rust Ug99 and related race group are one of the major constraints of wheat production in Kenya. The challenge has been largely due to rapid evolution of races within lineage defeating resistance genes resulting in boom and burst cycles. Understanding of the pathogen population structure in major wheat growing regions in Kenya gives comprehensive information of the predominant races as well as capturing new races which may have potential of causing epidemics. Such information can have significant impact on effective gene stewardship in breeding resistant varieties. Using 11 Pgt Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) markers we analyzed 104 single uredinial-pustule samples. Allele frequency distribution ranged from 2 to 6 per locus with an average of 3.27 per locus. Observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.297-1.000 (mean HO=?0.809) was significantly different (P< 0.001) than the expected heterozygosity (0.264 to 0.507; mean HE=?0.407) indicating that the population is asexual. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that the majority of the variation occurred within the samples (98%) rather than between regions (2%). Analysis of 104 samples identified 21 multiple locus genotypes (MLGs). MLG.19 was observed across the three region analyzed that is Central Rift, North Rift and Mount Kenya while MLG.18 was predominant in Mount Kenya. Based on SSR genotypes of reference isolates, Pgt clade IV (race TKTTF) was associated with MLG.16 in Central Rift Kenya while clade I (race TTKSK) had a unique MLG.10. These results indicated two main groups corresponding to Clade I (Ug99 race group) and Clade IV (race TKTTF race group). This minimum spanning network analysis pattern points to the Pgt population being asexual due to mutation. These preliminary results suggest that Pgt population in Kenya is asexual in nature. Further analysis is being conducted to ascertain geographical structure as well as compare the results with the 2011 data.

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