All BGRI Abstracts

Displaying 21 - 30 of 415 records | 3 of 42 pages

Enrichment of Indian wheat germplasm with stripe rust resistant genes

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Ravish Chatrath ICAR-Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research, Karnal
Satish Kumar, Ratan Tiwari, Gyanendra Pratap Singh

Stripe rust, is a major constraint to wheat production in the more than 12.8 m ha region of the Northern Hills and North Western Plains zones in India. The previously deployed resistance genes Yr9 and Yr27 are no longer effective. New sources of resistance (Yr5, Yr10, Yr15, Yr24) became available under the umbrella of an Indo-Australian collaborative project. A set of advanced backcross derivative lines out yielded the checks in preliminary evaluations and were promoted to station-level (16 lines) and national (5 lines) trials. A new cohort of resistance genes (Yr47, Yr51, Yr57) are now available and are being used in the breeding program. Resistance genes Yr17, Yr18, Yr31, Yr36, Yr40, Yr53, YrC591, and Yr70 are also being used. The recent progress in development of high yielding, stripe rust resistant lines will help to address future threats from stripe rust.

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Status and strategies for averting the threat of yellow rust (Puccinia striiformis Westend.) in North Indian states

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
D. P. Singh ICAR-Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research
Sudheer Kumar, P.L. Kashyap, Gyanendra Pratap Singh

Yellow rust of wheat caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. is one of the important diseases of wheat in India. In north Indian states it spreads quite fast due to favourable temperature and moisture prevailing in these states during major part of crop growth (November-mid March). In spite of favourable weather, proactive survey and surveillance and advisories issued in time resulted successful management of yellow rust in India during past four decades. Even large scale cultivation of varieties like HD 2967 in about 12 million ha past two years did not result any losses. Three spots of initial foci near foot hills in Punjab have been identified and are monitored regularly. Any sign of yellow rust is controlled effectively with the foliar sprays of fungicides like propiconazole @ 0.1%. Use of mobiles phones and internet services is regularly done for transfer of information on wheat crop health and suggestions for proper management. Strategic planting and sowing of wheat in which newly released high yielding yellow rust varieties helped in reducing the yellow rust inculum build up. Regular monitoring of wheat health via weather forecasts take place after every fortnight from December to March. During 2016-17 crop season, yellow rust was effectively managed and its occurrence was delayed in Punjab, Haryana and Uttarakhand states. Two new pathotypes, 110S 119 and 110S 84 developed recently were used for evaluation of entries of wheat yield trials during 2016-17 at hot spot locations. The new varieties in pipe line of identification and release are tested against yellow rust. The most critical period for yellow rust management remained from December till mid February.

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Stripe rust virulence in western Canada

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Harpinder Randhawa Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, Alberta
Gurcharn Brar, Randy Kutcher, Raman Dhariwal

Stripe rust of wheat, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most important diseases of wheat in western Canada. Although stripe rust was an issue in southern Alberta for many years, it became important in other parts of the country after a dramatic population shift in 2000, resulting from an invasive race. Sporadic epidemics of the disease are common and cause considerable loss, due to which, an intermediate level of resistance to stripe rust was required for new varietal registrations beginning 2017. Virulence surveys are of key importance in germplasm and cultivar development as they provide breeders and pathologists the information needed to better understand host-pathogen interactions and the effectiveness of Yr genes. Virulence characterization revealed a wide range of virulence phenotypes exhibited by 33 Pst races in western Canada, although only 2-3 races were predominant. The expression of Yr genes may differ between controlled conditions and natural field conditions as previously reported. Thus, stripe rust differentials and wheat cultivars grown in western Canada are also screened at multiple locations in every year. At present, all stage resistance genes Yr1, Yr4, Yr5, Yr15, Yr76, and YrSP are effective against the predominant Pst races, whereas at the adult stage under field conditions, Yr2, Yr17, Yr28, or those carried by Yamhill are also effective. Seedling resistance genes Yr7, Yr10, Yr17, or Yr27 were the most common in Canadian wheat cultivars. Of these, only Yr17 is effective under field conditions. Adult plant resistance genes Yr18 and Yr29 are carried by many cultivars, but are not effective under high disease pressure. The effectiveness of each resistance gene may vary between the eastern and western prairies of western Canada due to differences in virulence. Regular virulence surveys using contemporary and regional cultivars facilitate the development of rust resistant cultivars.

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Towards delivery of suitably high yielding, stable, and rust resistant wheat genotypes in the stem rust hotspots of Kenya

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Godwin Macharia Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization
Ruth Wanyera, Bernard Otukho, Bernice Waweru, Hellen Wairimu, Sridhar Bhavani

Emergence of Pgt race Ug99 and rapid proliferation of lineal highly virulent races imminently threaten Kenyan wheat. Devastating epidemics have led to huge losses among smallholder farmers who invariably are unable to spray appropriately and in situations where susceptible varieties are grown. To combat stem rust, the Kenya wheat improvement program seeks to release high yielding stable genotypes with suitable levels of disease resistance. Moreover, detection of genotypes that are adapted to rain-fed environments is an overarching objective. Six hundred and seventeen genotypes from various CIMMYT nurseries (PCBW, EPCBW, PCHPLUS, and 9th SRRSN) were selected based on plant type and reaction to stem rust at Njoro. The reconstituted nursery-KSRON, was sown in the main season of 2016 at Njoro and Timau for further evaluation. Forty red grained lines depicting R-MR infection types, severity of 30% or less, and average Thousand Kernel Weight of >40g were then selected to constitute a yield trial. At each of eight diverse environments, trials also comprising four commercial varieties as checks, were designed in RCBD, three replicates laid out in contiguous array of 8 rows x 10 m plots. Genotype (G), Environment (E) and GE interactions effects were estimated by fitting the AMMI model to yield data, supported by a biplot visualization of the results. Analysis revealed significant (P ?0.01) genotype (G), environment (E), and GE interactions. The first three principal components (PC) explained ~78% of the observed variation. Environment was the predominant source contributing over 85% to total sum of squares. The biplot pointed to at least four environments that were highly correlated. By classifying genotypes based on Shukla's stability variance and Kang's stability rating, six genotypes (R1402, R1411, R1424, R1481, R1484, and R1486) were deemed high yielding and stable, and thus suitable candidates for further testing through the release pipeline.

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Paving the path of durum: Identification of flowering genes and heterotic behavior for root vigor

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Priyanka Gupta University of Bologna, Italy/ International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas, Morocco
Hafssa Kabbaj, khaoula El hassouni, Elisabetta Frascaroli, Angelo Petrozza, Stephan Summerer, Marco Maccaferri, Miguel Sanchez-Garcia, Roberto Tuberosa, Filippo M. Bassi

Global food security is faced with many threats including population growth and changing climate. To cope with these threats a new paradigm shift is required to ensure sufficient and sustainable crop production. Hybrid technology could represent a partly strategic solution for durum wheat, but the understanding of its heterotic behavior is very limited. In this study, 53 F1 plants were produced via half diallel scheme and North Carolina design II, using as parental elite lines selected on the basis of their genetic distance. These hybrids along with their parents were evaluated for different physiological and root traits on a precision phenotyping platform (Lemnatec) at different levels of water stress. Additionally, a second root test was conducted in near field condition via a basket method to determine shallow or deep rooting behavior. Hybrids with the most heterotic combinations in terms of above and below ground biomass were identified. However, in order to ensure adequate pollination between heterotic parents, their flowering time must overlap. To identify good matching partners, a GWAS study was conducted to identify genomic regions associated with the control of flowering time in durum wheat. A total of 384 landraces and modern germplasm were assessed at 13 environments with different temperatures and day length throughout the season. Genotyping was conducted by 35K Axiom array to generate 8,173 polymorphic SNPs. In total, 12 significant QTLS for landraces and 17 QTLs for modern germplasm were identified consistently across environments. These two results when combined will allow to predict the best parental partners for hybrid production via markers screening on the basis of their genetic similarity to the most heterotic groups, and with matching flowering times.

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Three years of the Precision Wheat Phenotyping Platform for diseases in Uruguay: current status and future prospects

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Gustavo Azzimonti Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria (INIA), Estaci?n La Estanzuela, Ruta 50, Km 11, Colonia, Uruguay
Vanesa,Domeniguini, N?stor, Gonz?lez, Richard, Garcia, Carolina, Saint-Pierre, Pawan, Singh, Mart?n, Quincke, Silvia, Pereyra, Silvia, Germ?n, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Since 2014 CGIAR-WHEAT Program has promoted the establishment of a network of field-based Precision Wheat Phenotyping Platforms (PWPP) to expand the existing collaborations between CIMMYT, ICARDA and National Agricultural Research System partners. The main goals are improving the quality of data collected and shared among institutions to enhance and accelerate the international wheat breeding, and promote synergism with the private sector and nongovernmental organizations. In 2015, the PWPP-Uruguay was established to test genotypes for multiple diseases: leaf rust, Fusarium head blight and Septoria tritici blotch. These diseases are phenotyped each year in separate field trials artificially inoculated with pathogen isolates identified as representatives of the pathogen regional population. Wheat material is sowed in plots with susceptible checks every 50 entries. Disease severity and other variables related to the disease development are measured using standard international scales at dates when the expression of plant resistance is optimal. In the first three years of the platform, more than 1500 genotypes were screened per year. These materials had diverse origins (more than eight institutions, public and private, from eight countries) and diverse types: from recent commercialized to ancient cultivars, advanced lines, International CIMMYT nurseries, mapping populations or panels. Highly resistant genotypes to multiple diseases could be selected. At the present time, we are developing and adopting advanced phenotyping methods, combining remote sensing and image analysis, and exploring their adaptation to breeding constraints. Also, extension activities as internships, training courses and student projects are being developed. Major future prospects are the enhancement of data and germplasm exchange between platform partners and the PWPP network and the involvement in collaborative phenotyping/genotyping breeding projects.

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Spike photosynthesis and its role in grain filling in Indian wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Chanderkant Chaudhary Department of Plant Molecular Biology, University of Delhi South Campus
Paramjit Khurana

The flag leaf and spike are the prime organs in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) which contribute majorly for spike photosynthesis and eventually aid in grain filling. In this study we have tried to elucidate the effect of abiotic stress on the grain filling and spike photosynthesis. In order to unravel the role of flag leaf, awn, and spike in wheat grain filling and spike photosynthesis, 1000-kernel weight were calculated after removing flag leaves, awns, and by shading the spike in four wheat genotypes (PBW343, C306, K7903, HD2329) for two seasons (2014-2015, 2015-2016). A significant decrease in the grain filling was observed for all the genotypes. These results indicate the role of these organs in spike photosynthesis. The role of the awn tissue was investigated in PBW343 for its role in spike photosynthesis during heat stress. Deep transcriptome sequencing of the awn tissue (PBW343) was performed and it revealed 147573 unigenes. Out of these, 394 genes were differentially expressed genes (DEGs). These DEGs constitutes 201 upregulated and 193 downregulated genes. Genes involved in photosynthesis (Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activase B, NADH dehydrogenase, Fe-S protein2), membrane integrity (ATP-dependent zinc metalloprotease FTSH6), and ion channel transporters (two-pore potassium channel3) were prominently expressed. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis represents PSII associated light-harvesting complex II catabolism, chloroplast organization, photosynthesis light harvesting in photosystemI, ethylene biosynthesis, regulation of oxidoreductase activity, stomatal closure, chlorophyll biosynthesis categories, which are highly overrepresented under heat stress conditions. Therefore, utilizing the awn transcriptome information, Rubisco activase (RCA) gene was chosen for overexpression studies in wheat and rice with the aim to enhance the photosynthetic efficiency of the spike tissue leading to higher grain filling.

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Developing rust resistant bread wheat genotypes for warmer areas in India

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Sanjay Kumar Singh ICAR- Indian Institute of Wheat & Barley Research, Karnal-132001, India
Vinod Tiwari, DP Singh, RP Gangwar, GP Singh

The changing climatic conditions are affecting wheat production in major agro-ecological zones in India, namely, north western plains(NWPZ), north eastern plains(NEPZ), central (CZ) and peninsular zone(PZ) where the reproductive phase has to endure higher temperatures. Also, the prevalence and virulence of rust pathotypes and other diseases are affected. To address such challenges, development of wheat for climate resilience was initiated following shuttle breeding approach for incorporating heat stress tolerance as well as resistance to wheat rusts. During 2010-16, a total of 583 elite lines were evaluated against prevalent pathotypes of stripe rust 78S84, 110S119, 110S84 and 46S119; leaf rust 12-2(1R5), 12-5(29R45), 77-2(109R31-1), 77-5(121R63-1), 77-9(121R60-1) and 104-2 (21R55) and stem rust 11(79G31), 40A(62G29), 42(19G35), 122(7G11) and 117-6(37G19) of which 108 promising entries were identified. These lines were evaluated for disease response in multilocational Initial Plant Pathological Screening Nursery (IPPSN) against prevalent races of all three rusts. Based on average coefficient of infection (15.0 ACI), 42 (39%), 104 (96%) and 90(83%) entries were found resistant to different races of stripe, leaf and stem rusts, respectively. Based on performance in multiplication yield trials, 29 entries were contributed in national coordinated evaluation system on Wheat & Barley which resulted in release of four wheat cultivars DBW71(Yr9+27+,Lr26+,Sr2+5+31+), DBW107(Yr9+,Lr26+3+,Sr31+), DBW110(Yr2+, Lr13+10+,Sr13+11+) and DBW93(Yr9+, Lr26+23+, Sr31+) for commercial cultivation in NWPZ, NEPZ, CZ and PZ, respectively. These cultivars are becoming popular among farmers due to their yield advantage, resistance to diseases, tolerance to high temperature and better quality traits. Also, DBW 129 was screened in multiple disease screening nursery (MDSN) and observed resistant to all rusts, leaf blight, powdery mildew, flag smut and shoot fly. The adoption of the newly developed cultivars for deployment of differential genes for resistance would lead to reduction in disease pressure and bring higher profitability to farmers in different agro-ecological zones in India.

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Impact of stem rust infection on grain yield of selected wheat cultivars in Egypt

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Osama Abd El Badia Wheat Disease Research Department
Mohamed Abdalla, Sobhy Negm, Adel Hagras

This work was carried out to study the response of five bread and two durum wheat cultivars to stem rust and its effect on grain yield under field conditions at Sids and Beni Sweif stations during the three growing seasons 2011/2012, 2012/2013 and 2013/2014. The loss in grain yield and kernel weight of the different wheat genotypes was variable according to the varietal response. Grain yield and kernel weight of the protected plots (protected by the effective fungicide Sumi-eight 5EC(CE)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)1-4,4-dimethyl1-2-(1,2,4-triazol-y1)Pent -1-en -3-0L) at the rate of 70cm /200litter water per Fadden ) of all wheat genotypes were higher than the infected ones. Significant differences were found between infected and protected wheat genotypes.. Disease severity was recorded weekly to estimate area under disease progress curve (AUDPC). The AUDPC ranged from 85.33 to 405.00 (Sids 1 and Sohag 3) during 2011/2012, from 181.66 to 805.00 (Shandwel 1 and Sohag 3) during 2012/2013, and from 142.33 to 585.00 (Shandwel 1 and Sohag 3) during 2013/2014. Losses in kernel weight ranged from 3.39% to 31.03% (Sids 1 and Misr 1) during 2011/2012, from 9.79% to 44.18% (Sids 1 and Sohag 3) during 2012/2013,and from 5.67% to 26.86% (Sids 1 and Sohag 3) during 2013/2014. Yield losses ranged from 5.70% to 37.52% (Shandwel 1 and Misr 1) during 2011/2012, from 7.75% to 45.78% (Shandwel 1 and Misr 1) during 2012/2013, and from 7.14% to 30.59% (Sids 1 and Sohag 3) during 2013/2014. Yield losses correlated strongly with AUDPC. The results of this study indicate that bread wheat cultivars are (Giza 168,Sakha 93, Sids 1, Misr 1, Misr 2 and Shandwel 1) and Durum wheat are ( Beni Sweif 5 and Sohag 3) more tolerant than durum wheat cultivars. The Egyptian bread wheat cultivars Sids 1 and Shandawel 1 are more tolerant than the other bread wheat cultivars.
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Genes Sr2/Yr30 and Lr34/Yr18/Sr57 interact to confer enhanced adult plant resistance to the three rust diseases of common wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Mandeep Singh Randhawa International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Apdo. Postal 6-641, 06600 Mexico D.F., Mexico
Ravi P. Singh, Caixia Lan, Bhoja R. Basnet, Sridhar Bhavani, Julio Huerta-Espino, Kerrie L. Forrest, Matthew J. Hayden

Common wheat Arula displays an acceptable level of adult plant resistance (APR) to stripe rust (YR), leaf rust (LR) and stem rust (SR) in Mexico, and to SR (Ug99 races) in Kenya. A recombinant inbred line (RIL) population developed from the cross of Arula with susceptible parent Apav was phenotyped under artificially created epidemics of the three rusts in 2014, 2015 and 2016 in Mexico and for SR during the off and main seasons of 2015 in Kenya. The RIL population and parents were genotyped using an iSelect 90K SNP array and 3 gene-linked markers (Sr2/Yr30-gwm533; Lr34/Yr18/Sr57-csLV34; Lr68-csGS), and a genetic map of 2,634 markers was constructed to locate the resistance loci. Two consistent QTL contributed by Arula were detected on chromosomes 3BS and 7DS, which corresponded to the previously known APR genes Sr2/Yr30 and Lr34/Yr18/Sr57, respectively. Sr2/Yr30 explained 1.1-14.7% and 41.0-61.5% of the phenotypic variation for YR and SR, respectively; whereas Lr34/Yr18/Sr57 accounted for 22.5-78.0%, 40.0-84.3% and 13.8-24.8% of the phenotypic variation for YR, LR and SR, respectively. Arula was also found to carry the positive allele for marker csGS closely linked to gene Lr68 on chromosome 7BL, although this gene was not detected using composite interval mapping. Our results show that RILs possessing both Sr2/Yr30 and Lr34/Yr18/Sr57 had significantly enhanced APR to all three rusts in field trials conducted in Mexico and Kenya. Strategic utilization of these two pleiotropic, multi-pathogen resistance genes with other minor genes is recommended to develop durable rust resistant wheat cultivars.

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